Red Sea Shark Warrior's Shark Count 2012

Calling out to all instructors and dive guides working in the Red Sea this summer.

Red Sea Shark Warrior's Shark Count 2012
Sharm el Sheikh Sharm el Sheikh
Egypt
27° 51' 30.6144" N, 34° 16' 38.4384" E
Friday, August 17, 2012 - 01:00 - Friday, August 31, 2012 - 23:59

Help us to help the sharks. Marine biologist Angela Warrior is here as part of her Red Sea Shark Warriors program to assess the number of sharks being seen in the Red Sea this summer.

Dive guides may have noted that their numbers have been decreasing over the years, and this needs to be registered and addressed.

Angela is in Sharm at the moment gathering data of shark sightings in the Red Sea so do help with her project.  

The Red Sea has always been famous not only for its spectacular corals and amazing visibility, but for its sharks that return every summer to feast on the gatherings of spawning fish that build up during the summer months around the fabulous reefs in the area.

It is suspected that several factors could be causing their depletion, such as shark finning in other areas of the Red Sea and further South, illegal fishing of the snapper and emperor shoals in the Ras Mohammed National Park, and excessive numbers of snorkelers, divers and boats in the area. But without any hard evidence to the fact, little can be done to protect them.

Please join in and add any shark sightings you have had since the 1st July 2012. It is also important to note the change in number of sharks you have been seeing over the years, as well as any other information about your sightings such as date, depth, size of shark and its behaviour. 

If you have seen her questionnaires at your dive centre, please complete one and have it returned to her. If not, then pop along to her facebook page where you can post your shark sightings on line.

It is vital that we gain this information in order to try and help the sharks' survival, or maybe even restore their numbers here in the Red Sea a little. Even in my few years here, I have seen a decline from the numbers of sharks being seen in 2005 to the odd one being seen now in 2012.