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Read about all the latest developments in the ocean protection movement.

 

In the News

Sep. 04/13

Debris divers and rubbish wranglers are being called on for the coming Macandrew Bay clean-up.

Project AWARE co-ordinator Emma Young said the range of marine rubbish on the harbour floor at Macandrew Bay was diverse.

It ranged from ''the smallest bits of plastic, car batteries and appliances, to enormous fishing nets''.

The bay also included several species of marine life, including sea-horses, octopus and sea lions, she said.

''Let's keep it clean for them.''

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Aug. 07/13

Green turtles are swallowing plastic at twice the rate they did 25 years ago, according to a University of Queensland study.

Researchers from the School of Biological Sciences and CSIRO's Wealth from Oceans Flagship who analysed global research data from the past 25 years have found green and leatherback turtles are eating more plastic than ever before.

Study leader and PhD candidate Qamar Schuyler said turtles ate more plastic than any other form of debris.

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Aug. 07/13

Each June and July near the full moon, the northern Gulf of Mexico hosts a mysterious gathering of whale sharks.

Dozens of the hulking black sharks with white spots glide about with mouths agape as they skim the water’s surface during a 12-hour tuna egg buffet of sorts.

A decade ago, records of these unusual gatherings existed only in fishermen’s tales.

Scientists have spent the past decade piecing together an understanding of the fish’s existence in the northern Gulf and tracking these gatherings that have also been reported in other parts of the world.

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Jul. 30/13

A new TRAFFIC study examines how implementation of trade controls through CITES regulations can ensure that seven species of sharks and manta rays are only sourced sustainably and legally before entering international trade.

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Jul. 17/13

New research shows that great white sharks power their non-stop journeys of more than 2,500 miles with energy stored as fat and oil in their massive livers. The findings provide novel insights into the biology of these ocean predators.

Great white sharks are not exactly known as picky eaters, so it might seem obvious that these voracious predators would dine often and well on their migrations across the Pacific Ocean. But not so, according to new research by scientists at Stanford University and the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

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Jul. 22/13

An event aimed at raising community awareness about the practice of shark finning went swimmingly at Dunedin's Moana Pool yesterday.

Event co-ordinator Emma Young was pleased with the community response to the swimming Finathon™', which attracted about 45 swimmers, young and old, between 2.45pm and 6pm yesterday.

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Jul. 17/13

New behavioural research led by Cranfield ecological scientists shows that, contrary to historical beliefs, sharks are quick to learn and have good memories.

Drs Joel Kimber and Andrew Gill, who designed and conducted the study, suggest that this type of research will help improve the status of the much-misunderstood sharks. This is vitally important as many species are endangered and need protection and public support, because of dramatic population declines caused by unregulated fishing.

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Jun. 27/13

Scientists have discovered a diverse multitude of microbes colonizing and thriving on flecks of plastic that have polluted the oceans—a vast new human-made flotilla of microbial communities that they have dubbed the "plastisphere."

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Jun. 19/13

The presence of plastic octopus pots on beaches in Little Cayman and throughout the Caribbean is shedding light on how the oceans’ currents are distributing a huge assortment of marine debris around the world.

Beachcomber Judie Clee, who lives usually in Bermuda but also owns a home in Little Cayman, has found the plastic pots in both places and with the help of a wildlife biologist based in Florida has even managed to trace some of the pots to their source in Africa.

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Jun. 14/13

The new listings of species and the 165 Decisions and 36 Resolutions adopted or revised at the 16th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Bangkok, in March 2013 entered into force on Wednesday 12th June. As a result, the 178 member countries will start regulating the international trade in over three hundred new species now protected by CITES.

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