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Read about all the latest developments in the ocean protection movement.

 

In the News

Jul. 17/13

New behavioural research led by Cranfield ecological scientists shows that, contrary to historical beliefs, sharks are quick to learn and have good memories.

Drs Joel Kimber and Andrew Gill, who designed and conducted the study, suggest that this type of research will help improve the status of the much-misunderstood sharks. This is vitally important as many species are endangered and need protection and public support, because of dramatic population declines caused by unregulated fishing.

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Jun. 27/13

Scientists have discovered a diverse multitude of microbes colonizing and thriving on flecks of plastic that have polluted the oceans—a vast new human-made flotilla of microbial communities that they have dubbed the "plastisphere."

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Jun. 19/13

The presence of plastic octopus pots on beaches in Little Cayman and throughout the Caribbean is shedding light on how the oceans’ currents are distributing a huge assortment of marine debris around the world.

Beachcomber Judie Clee, who lives usually in Bermuda but also owns a home in Little Cayman, has found the plastic pots in both places and with the help of a wildlife biologist based in Florida has even managed to trace some of the pots to their source in Africa.

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Jun. 14/13

The new listings of species and the 165 Decisions and 36 Resolutions adopted or revised at the 16th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Bangkok, in March 2013 entered into force on Wednesday 12th June. As a result, the 178 member countries will start regulating the international trade in over three hundred new species now protected by CITES.

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Jun. 05/13

New study focuses on conservation as revenue generator.

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May. 29/13

Two leading marine science and conservation organizations, the Marine Conservation Institute and Mission Blue, issued the 1st-ever quantitative, scientifically rigorous national ranking of states’ protection of their ocean waters. SeaStates: How Well Does Your State Protect Your Coastal Waters? shows that most states and territories are failing to safeguard our nation’s marine life, seafood and coasts.

Oceans are crucial to our health and economy. MORE

May. 30/13

Sharks are worth more in the ocean than in a bowl of soup, according to researchers from the University of British Columbia.

A new study, published today in Oryx – The International Journal of Conservation, shows that shark ecotourism currently generates more than US$314 million annually worldwide and is expected to more than double to US$780 million in the next 20 years.

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May. 22/13

State fishery managers unanimously approve world's most lenient finning rules for region's second largest shark fishery

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May. 20/13

International trade in three shark species will be restricted following the adoption of new global rules.

The sale of smooth, great or scalloped hammerhead sharks will require government-issued permits under restrictions by the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

The UAE in March became one of 178 signatories to sign up to the rules, which also govern oceanic white-tip and porbeagle sharks, although neither of these are found in our waters.

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May. 07/13

The first-ever summit to focus specifically on the issue of marine debris around the African continent will be taking place during World Environmental Week and World Ocean Day, 6-8 June 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa.

Plastics SA, the umbrella body representing the South African plastics industry, has announced that it will be joining hands with the Department of Environmental Affairs, the South African National Biodiversity Institute and the United Nations Environment Programme in organising the conference which will bring together marine debris researchers, natural resource manag MORE