CITES

Sep. 12/14

New CITES trade controls come into effect on 14 September. Most comprehensive global effort seen in CITES’ 40-year history to give sharks and manta rays a better chance of surviving in the wild through robust regulation of international trade.

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Jul. 30/13

A new TRAFFIC study examines how implementation of trade controls through CITES regulations can ensure that seven species of sharks and manta rays are only sourced sustainably and legally before entering international trade.

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Jun. 14/13

The new listings of species and the 165 Decisions and 36 Resolutions adopted or revised at the 16th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Bangkok, in March 2013 entered into force on Wednesday 12th June. As a result, the 178 member countries will start regulating the international trade in over three hundred new species now protected by CITES.

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May. 20/13

International trade in three shark species will be restricted following the adoption of new global rules.

The sale of smooth, great or scalloped hammerhead sharks will require government-issued permits under restrictions by the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

The UAE in March became one of 178 signatories to sign up to the rules, which also govern oceanic white-tip and porbeagle sharks, although neither of these are found in our waters.

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May. 15/13

Endangered Species Day is an opportunity to learn about the importance of endangered species and actions we can take to protect them. Scuba divers, with a passion for the ocean like no other, are naturally concerned about decline in marine species.

The good news is, we’re a strong voice and we’re achieving major milestones together. Just recently, we won campaigns to list oceanic whitetip sharks, porbeagles, three species of hammerheads and both manta rays under CITES.   

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Fished at alarming rates, manta and devil rays line the streets of many fish markets around the world – sought primarily for their gill rakers – the feathery structures these filter feeders use to strain food as they glide through the water. At a one-time payout of about $250 per kilogram versus approximately $1 million in tourism over a manta’s lifetime, is it really worth the destruction?

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Apr. 19/13

Fished at alarming rates, manta and devil rays line the streets of many fish markets around the world – sought primarily for their gill rakers – the feathery structures these filter feeders use to strain their food as they glide through the water. At a one-time payout of about $250 per kilogram, is it really worth the destruction?

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Mar. 15/13

As part of the last meeting of the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), held this week in Bangkok (Thailand), the national government banned fishing for oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus) in Brazilian waters.

The decision was made in order to preserve this endangered species.

According to a Normative Instruction of the Ministry of the Environment published in the Official Journal of Unión, the ban on fishing this resource MORE

Mar. 15/13

An outpouring of support from the scuba diving community for critical CITES protections

Five species of highly traded sharks, both manta rays and one species of sawfish were listed under CITES at the conclusion of CoP16 held this month in Bangkok, Thailand. Delegates from 170 countries considered 70 proposals affecting more than 300 species, including eight of some of the most vulnerable sharks and manta rays.

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Mar. 11/13

Proposals to list close relatives of sharks also advance on historic day at COP

Bangkok, 11 March 2013.  Following on the heels of unprecedented Committee votes to control international trade in commercially valuable sharks, Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) went on to adopt proposals to list three species of closely related rays by even wider margins.

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