Sep. 04/15

"What will you do to the protect the ocean?" That was the call from the US Secretary of State, John Kerry, earlier in the year. It's a call for collaboration. A call on governments, business leaders and individuals to work together and tackle the many problems our ocean faces.  

Jun. 05/15

When I was a kid, our school used to run annual cleanups. It was always really fun. Firstly, we got to miss classes - yippee! But secondly - and more importantly - we discussed how we can protect the environment, we designed posters with messages, and talked about actions we could take to stop littering. I felt like I could take on the world and make it a better place.

Sep. 30/14

As Debris Month of Action comes to an end, I thought I’d take the opportunity to catch up with one of our first Dive Against Debris Distinctive Specialty Instructors who has taught the course.

Nov. 08/14
Picnic Island Park Fishing Pier
7404 Picnic Island Blvd
Tampa, FL 33616
United States
27° 51' 39.3516" N, 82° 32' 36.348" W

Divers Against Debris Shore/Pier Clean-Up Dive

Saturday, November 8, 2014 8 - Noon

Held at Picnic Island Park Fishing Pier, Tampa Florida

(See attached Flyer for more details or call 813-832-6669 or go to adventuretampa.com, or stop by Adventure Outfitters at 4352 S. Manhattan Ave, Tampa, Florida 33611)

May. 30/14

World Oceans Day, 8th June, is right around the corner and it’s the perfect time to make strong arguments for change. All month long, Project AWARE is taking advantage of strategic opportunities to represent the voice of divers – a powerful constituency when it comes to ocean protection.

Our focus areas – sharks and marine debris – are high on the global policy agenda this month and Project AWARE aims to advocate for the ocean where and when the important decisions are made.

Apr. 22/14

Cars, a makeshift toilet, a full set of golf clubs, a set of false teeth and a pogo stick. These are just some of the unusual items found by volunteer scuba divers who are helping Project AWARE offer a new, underwater view of the problem of trash – much of it plastic – in the ocean.

Mar. 27/14

We’ve been removing debris from underwater environments together for decades but now, we’re going to share what we’ve found with the rest of the world. More importantly, we’re going to use the information to prevent the trash from our everyday lives from ending up in the ocean in the first place.

That's why Project AWARE launched Dive Against Debris in 2011. With the help of thousands of divers, debris removal efforts have stepped up and divers are actively protecting marine life including sharks and rays that can get tangled in trash.

Jan. 02/14

Thousands of pieces of plastic have been discovered, submerged along the river bed of the upper Thames Estuary by scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London and the Natural History Museum.

The sheer amount of plastic recovered shows there is an unseen stream of rubbish flowing through London which could be a serious threat to aquatic wildlife. The findings, published online in Marine Pollution Bulletin, highlight the cause for concern, not only for ecosystems around the river but for the North Sea, in to which the Thames flows.

Nov. 28/13

Each square kilometre of ocean around Australia is polluted with thousands of 'invisible' fragments of plastic, a new study has found, posing a potential health hazard for humans and marine life alike.

Julia Reisser, a PhD student from the University of Western Australia's Ocean Institute, and colleagues, report their findings today in the journal PLOS ONE.

Nov. 13/13

Rays trapped in lost fishing nets, floating plastic bags resembling jellyfish, glass bottles and tyres covering the ocean floor are all too common a sight for scuba divers who are the first to see how devastating marine litter is underwater.  Many of us pick up trash every time we dive. We organize or participate in Dive Against Debris. And between now and December 18th, you have a unique opportunity to share your opinion on how the European Union (EU) can best tackle marine litter.