Oceanic whitetip

Mar. 15/13

As part of the last meeting of the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), held this week in Bangkok (Thailand), the national government banned fishing for oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus) in Brazilian waters.

The decision was made in order to preserve this endangered species.

According to a Normative Instruction of the Ministry of the Environment published in the Official Journal of Unión, the ban on fishing this resource MORE

Feb. 21/13

Some sharks spend extended time periods in the protected waters of the Bahamas yet roam long distances when they leave

As the nations of the world prepare to vote on measures to restrict international trade in endangered sharks in early March, a team of researchers has found that one of these species – the oceanic whitetip shark – regularly crosses international boundaries. Efforts by individual nations to protect this declining apex predator within their own maritime borders may therefore need to be nested within broader international conservation measures.

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Feb. 17/13

Designed by Guillermo Munro of www.memuco.org you can download the Oceanic Whitetip Infograph and learn more about what's threatening the survival of this incredible shark.

 

Feb. 18/13

The oceanic whitetip may not be as famous as it's great white or whale shark relatives but it could soon gain the same level of protection through its listing on Appendix II of CITES.

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Jun. 15/12

Your voice mattered again this week. On June 11th, 2012 Project AWARE Foundation together with Shark Advocates International, Humane Society International, and WildAid sent a letter to the United States Fish And Wildlife Service as part of a public comment process on potential U.S. proposals for listing sharks and other species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

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Apr. 25/12

Oceanic whitetip sharks and hawksbill turtles appear to have little in common, but sadly they share a similar fate - both are highly valued for just one of their body parts, while the rest of the animal is usually discarded.

Hawksbill turtle shells are used for jewellery and souvenirs, while the oceanic whitetip's long, curved fins are highly prized for shark fin soup. In both cases the flesh is less valuable and often discarded, though whitetip shark meat is consumed in some regions.  

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