research

May. 11/12

Using the latest satellite tracking technology, conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Exeter (UK), and the Government of Mexico have completed a ground-breaking study on a mysterious ocean giant: the manta ray.

The research team has produced the first published study on the use of satellite telemetry to track the open-ocean journeys of the world's largest ray, which can grow up to 25 feet in width. MORE

May. 09/12

Sharp increase of small plastic debris in the 'Garbage Patch' could have ecosystem-wide consequences.

A 100-fold upsurge in human-produced plastic garbage in the ocean is altering habitats in the marine environment, according to a new study led by a graduate student researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

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Apr. 25/12

While working on a research sailboat gliding over glassy seas in the Pacific Ocean, oceanographer Giora Proskurowski noticed something new: The water was littered with confetti-size pieces of plastic debris, until the moment the wind picked up and most of the particles disappeared.

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Mar. 31/12
The decline of Caribbean coral reefs has been linked to the recent effects of human-induced climate change. However, new research led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego suggests an even earlier cause. The bad news – humans are still to blame. MORE
Feb. 21/12

Sharks are known for being ruthless, solitary predators, but scientists say the reality is the opposite.

A new study revealed that some sharks enjoy complex social lives that include longstanding relationships and teamwork.The study documents how one population of blacktip reef sharks is actually organized into four communities and two sub-communities.

The research found for the first time that adults of a reef-associated shark species form stable, long-term social bonds.

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Dec. 12/11

ONE in every six species related to characters in the smash hit kids' movie Finding Nemo is threatened with extinction.

Scientists analysed risks faced by Nemo, the charismatic clownfish, and more than 1500 other species related to characters in the 2003 animation.

International Union for Conservation of Nature and Canada's Simon Fraser University scientists, led by Loren McClenachan, found that hunting and fishing posed the greatest threat to their survival.

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Aug. 30/11

ScienceDaily® (Aug. 30, 2011) - Preserving just 4 percent of the ocean could protect crucial habitat for the vast majority of marine mammal species, from sea otters to blue whales, according to researchers at Stanford University and the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Their findings were published in the Aug. 16 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Jun. 27/11

Shark populations over the last 50 years have decreased dramatically. From habitat degradation to overfishing and finning, human activities have affected their populations and made certain species all but disappear.

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