Latest Updates

Read about all the latest developments in the ocean protection movement.

 

AWARE Updates

May. 23/13

We know marine debris is preventable. Together, we can stop it by taking local action and supporting policy change. I did exactly that by Diving Against Debris for the first time since becoming the Executive Director of Project AWARE during a visit to the beautiful island of Koh Tao. My visit followed AWARE’s successful campaign efforts for vulnerable sharks and rays at CITES in March 2013 and it was exciting to share recent victory with our supporters.

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May. 15/13

Endangered Species Day is an opportunity to learn about the importance of endangered species and actions we can take to protect them. Scuba divers, with a passion for the ocean like no other, are naturally concerned about decline in marine species.

The good news is, we’re a strong voice and we’re achieving major milestones together. Just recently, we won campaigns to list oceanic whitetip sharks, porbeagles, three species of hammerheads and both manta rays under CITES.   

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May. 08/13

I was very touched when I was invited to come back to my roots and represent Project AWARE in British Columbia, my home province in Canada, where I first learned to dive. The diving community of British Columbia invited me, in cooperation with the Shaw Ocean Discovery Center and the Vancouver Aquarium, to speak about the inspiring initiatives Project AWARE works toward at home and abroad to protect the underwater world. 

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Apr. 18/13

A study just published in the Journal of Marine Biology sheds new light on the relatively rare but occasionally recorded presence of white sharks in waters surrounding the Hawaiian Islands, and suggests a new method to help distinguish between white sharks and close relatives, such as mako sharks. The paper, titled "Occurrence of White Sharks in Hawaiian Waters," was written by Kevin Weng of the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) and Randy Honebrink of the Hawai'i DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR).

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Apr. 30/13

The Finathon concept was born in 2011 from one scuba diver’s passion for sharks and has now swept the globe, raising critical funds for shark protection and inspiring a movement to end finning. The first Finathon™ took place in the town of Stoke on Trent, in the heart of England.  An unlikely place to find a tribe of FINatical shark advocates.

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Apr. 19/13

Fished at alarming rates, manta and devil rays line the streets of many fish markets around the world – sought primarily for their gill rakers – the feathery structures these filter feeders use to strain their food as they glide through the water. At a one-time payout of about $250 per kilogram, is it really worth the destruction?

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Apr. 17/13

Maptivism = maps + activism. Interactive online maps are an excellent way to communicate and engage, often telling a story in a way that words can’t. Maps can do anything from reporting emergencies, documenting event to instantly interpreting complex data. They can even find you the best coffee in town.

“Online mapping is only four or five years old, but it has become so integrated into our lives we often forget how new and innovative it is,” writes Lisa Goldman on techpresident.com.

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Apr. 10/13

A major community information and mobilisation campaign has started in Australia in the runup to government decisions about packaging policy.  Called ‘Kicking the Can’ the 27 state and national environment groups in the Boomerang Alliance, of which Project AWARE is a member, is calling for governments to stop procrastinating and implement a national container deposit system.

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Mar. 26/13

Just a few days remain in the public comment period for an Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) proposal to weaken the coast-wide ban on finning (slicing off a shark’s fins and discarding the body at sea). Project AWARE and Shark Advocates International need your help to stop changes that would provide wiggle room for finning smoothhounds and other sharks, and set a terrible policy precedent.

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Mar. 15/13

An outpouring of support from the scuba diving community for critical CITES protections

Five species of highly traded sharks, both manta rays and one species of sawfish were listed under CITES at the conclusion of CoP16 held this month in Bangkok, Thailand. Delegates from 170 countries considered 70 proposals affecting more than 300 species, including eight of some of the most vulnerable sharks and manta rays.

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