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Celebrating Victories: Shark Finning Banned in Central America and Dominican Republic

Jan. 30/12

The harmonized, outright finning ban now in place in Central America and the Dominican Republic is a timely, critical argument in our battle to strengthen the existing European Union fining ban.

Project AWARE celebrates the recent shark finning ban for Belize, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama waters and also but also on all vessels that fly their flags.


The harmonized, outright finning ban now in place in Central America and the Dominican Republic is a timely, critical argument in our battle to strengthen the existing European Union fining ban. For the past six years, as a steering committee member of the Shark Alliance, Project AWARE and our partners have been pushing for a strong, enforceable ban in EU where sharks are landed with fins naturally attached, without exceptions. Just a couple of months ago we’ve enthusiastically welcomed the long-awaited proposal from the European Commission to close the loopholes in the EU’s ban on shark finning.


Shark finning - the practice of slicing off a shark’s fins and discarding the body at sea -- is an unacceptable fishing practice. It is associated with tremendous waste and unsustainable number of shark deaths. The difference between generally low value shark meat and high value shark fins drives the practice with fins selling for hundreds of dollars, euros or pounds per kilogram for use in a traditional Chinese soup.  


As members of the Central American Integration System (SICA), the eight countries adopted this binding regulation via the Fisheries and Aquaculture Sector Organization of the Central American Isthmus (OSPESCA). The regulations embrace a fins naturally attached policy – the easiest to enforce and most efficient way to end finning. In addition, it controls exports and imports of fins not attached to a body from or into SICA countries. A competent authority in the country of origin must certify that imported or exported fins are not the product of finning.


View the original news announcement here.

Comments

This is particularly

This is particularly interesting because three of the countries in this agreement are "flags of convenience" states. That means that any fishing vessel from around the world registered in Belize, Panama or Honduras is subject to this agreement when fishing in international waters. Of course there is the problem of enforcement. But it is of note that they will fall under this new regulation banning finning and requiring sharks landed with fins naturally attached.

2 years ago

A good step in the right

A good step in the right direction, but I am wondering if this will open other loopholes that will simply encourage/increase the use of shark meat?

2 years ago

Victory

Victory

2 years ago

Good stuff

Good stuff

2 years ago

!

!

2 years ago

Great info

Great info

2 years ago

What Fantastic News:D when I

What Fantastic News:D when I saw how those poor sharks suffer for first time i was shocked & so angry that people get away with it!:/

2 years ago

finnally there going to have

finnally there going to have a chance,now they need to stop fishing for a wile so that there enough food for all of them

2 years ago

'they'? as in 'you?' - no

'they'? as in 'you?' - no point putting the emphais on others to make a change.

2 years ago