Latest Updates

Latest Updates

Read about all the latest developments in the global underwater conservancy movement.

FEATURED UPDATES

Apr. 18/13

A study just published in the Journal of Marine Biology sheds new light on the relatively rare but occasionally recorded presence of white sharks in waters surrounding the Hawaiian Islands, and suggests a new method to help distinguish between white sharks and close relatives, such as mako sharks. The paper, titled "Occurrence of White Sharks in Hawaiian Waters," was written by Kevin Weng of the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) and Randy Honebrink of the Hawai'i DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR).

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May. 02/13

The good news is you don’t have to be an event organiser extraordinaire to get involved in the Finathon™ 2013. In fact you don’t actually have to swim at all.

Simply create your very own personal Finathon™ fundraising page, write a few words from the heart about why you love sharks, why sharks are totally awesome and why you think they deserve protecting. Make it personal and ask your friends to support the cause!

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Apr. 17/13

Maptivism = maps + activism. Interactive online maps are an excellent way to communicate and engage, often telling a story in a way that words can’t. Maps can do anything from reporting emergencies, documenting event to instantly interpreting complex data. They can even find you the best coffee in town.

“Online mapping is only four or five years old, but it has become so integrated into our lives we often forget how new and innovative it is,” writes Lisa Goldman on techpresident.com.

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Apr. 16/13

Today, the Obama Administration released its final plan for translating the National Ocean Policy into on-the-ground actions to benefit the American people.

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Apr. 15/13

Many terrestrial animals are frequently observed scavenging on other animals– whether it is a hyena stealing a lion kill in the Serengeti or a buzzard swooping down on a dead animal. MORE

Apr. 14/13

An exhausting battle spanning nearly 20 years for a new marine reserve in Akaroa Harbour is nearly at an end. 

The Akaroa Marine Protection Society, a group of about 20 determined locals headed by husband and wife team Brian and Kathleen Reid, has been fighting for a 530-hectare marine reserve in Akaroa Harbour since 1996.

The reserve, near Dan Rogers Bluff, would protect about 12 per cent of the harbour from fishing.

This afternoon, Conservation Minister Nick Smith announced his approval of the reserve. 

Akaroa Marine Protection Society secretary K MORE

Apr. 10/13

A major community information and mobilisation campaign has started in Australia in the runup to government decisions about packaging policy.  Called ‘Kicking the Can’ the 27 state and national environment groups in the Boomerang Alliance, of which Project AWARE is a member, is calling for governments to stop procrastinating and implement a national container deposit system.

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Apr. 01/13

Sea turtles can get accidentally caught and killed in fishing operations, and new research out Monday seeks to map this phenomenon for the first time in a bid to save the endangered creatures.

The study in the journal Ecosphere said sea turtles in the East Pacific, North Atlantic, Southwest Atlantic and Mediterranean face the highest bycatch mortality rates.

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Mar. 26/13

Just a few days remain in the public comment period for an Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) proposal to weaken the coast-wide ban on finning (slicing off a shark’s fins and discarding the body at sea). Project AWARE and Shark Advocates International need your help to stop changes that would provide wiggle room for finning smoothhounds and other sharks, and set a terrible policy precedent.

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Mar. 15/13

An outpouring of support from the scuba diving community for critical CITES protections

Five species of highly traded sharks, both manta rays and one species of sawfish were listed under CITES at the conclusion of CoP16 held this month in Bangkok, Thailand. Delegates from 170 countries considered 70 proposals affecting more than 300 species, including eight of some of the most vulnerable sharks and manta rays.

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Mar. 15/13

As part of the last meeting of the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), held this week in Bangkok (Thailand), the national government banned fishing for oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus) in Brazilian waters.

The decision was made in order to preserve this endangered species.

According to a Normative Instruction of the Ministry of the Environment published in the Official Journal of Unión, the ban on fishing this resource MORE

Mar. 13/13

Five commercially valuable shark species, manta rays & freshwater sawfish listed

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Mar. 12/13

Citizen science surveys compare well with traditional scientific methods when it comes to monitoring species biodiversity -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Research published today in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution shows that methods to record marine diversity used by amateurs returned results consistent with techniques favoured by peer-reviewed science.

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Mar. 11/13

Proposals to list close relatives of sharks also advance on historic day at COP

Bangkok, 11 March 2013.  Following on the heels of unprecedented Committee votes to control international trade in commercially valuable sharks, Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) went on to adopt proposals to list three species of closely related rays by even wider margins.

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Mar. 11/13

Conservationists look to final plenary to cement positive yet tentative decisions

Bangkok, 11 March 2013. In a highly anticipated Committee vote today, proposals to list under CITES* five species of sharks were supported by more than the two-thirds majority of voting countries needed for adoption. Conservationists are pleased yet mindful that decisions must still be confirmed in the final plenary session later this week.

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