Latest Updates

Read about all the latest developments in the ocean protection movement.

 

Latest Updates

Latest Updates

Read about all the latest developments in the global underwater conservancy movement.

FEATURED UPDATES

Oct. 16/11

Scarborough Sea Life Centre declared a ‘JAWS’ amnesty for the duration of European Shark Week, which began yesterday.

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Oct. 13/11

Project AWARE will once again be attending DIVE 2011 at the Birmingham's National Exhibition Centre (NEC) in the UK, which is taking place on Saturday 22 and Sunday 23 October 2011.

Visitors to this year's NEC Birmingham Dive Show will find more than 300 exhibitors taking part but Project AWARE will most likely be the loudest. Why? We will be shouting our lungs out for sharks!

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Oct. 10/11

As part of the new focus on shark conservation, Project AWARE just launched a new distinctive specialty course: AWARE Shark Conservation Diver.

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Oct. 11/11

September’s Debris Month of Action was a month chock full of underwater cleanup and data reporting activity. To date, more than 130 committed AWARE leaders reported data from the underwater trash they found last month. In total, data was reported from 160 Dive Against Debris surveys held at 90 locations around the world.

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Oct. 07/11

Last month, we kicked off the Debris Month of Action with a marine debris photo contest. We asked scuba divers and Dive Against Debris volunteers to photograph the weirdest and wildest trash they found underwater.

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Oct. 05/11

Crystal Dive Resort is at the forefront of marine conservation and education in Thailand. From mooring buoys installation and Dive Against Debris activities, to coral reef monitoring, artificial reefs and community projects, the team at Crystal Dive is always busy helping to ensure their local marine ecosystems remain healthy and vibrant. 

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Oct. 03/11

The Marshall Islands government has created the world's largest shark sanctuary, covering nearly two million sq km (750,000 sq miles) of ocean.

The Pacific republic will ban trade in shark products and commercial shark fishing throughout its waters.

Tourism, including diving, is a staple of the Marshall Islands archipelago, which is home to just 68,000 people.

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Sep. 30/11

Sharks are in big trouble on the Great Barrier Reef and worldwide, according to an Australian-based team who have developed a world-first way to measure rates of decline in shark populations.

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Sep. 29/11

Northwest Atlantic fishing countries reduce skate quotas, improve shark catch reporting slightly

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Sep. 19/11

The work Project AWARE divers undertake to keep our oceans healthy is "no walk in the park," despite the casual action captured in a recent photo contest submission, seen below.

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Sep. 28/11

On Saturday 9th July Sub-Mission Dive Club in the UK organised a charity Fin-athon called Fin4Finning. Divers were targeted with completing 100,000,000 millimetres in mask and fins collectively, swimming from 8 am until 10 pm.

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Sep. 28/11

Celebrating Heron Island as one of Australia’s premier dive destinations, the 2011 Heron Island Dive Festival took divers on an underwater adventure during the week of 05 - 11 September. Diving industry leaders and renowned dive speakers were at the festival to talk about a variety of topics. David Roe, Project AWARE Marine Conservation Officer, who attended the festival, reports on this great and well-attended event:

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Sep. 22/11

A new NOAA report of data collected in 2005 will help the agency’s scientists better monitor progress in reducing bycatch – the non-target fish, marine mammals, sea turtles, and seabirds caught incidentally in fishing.

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Sep. 19/11

As the annual meeting of Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organizations (NAFO) begins today in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Project AWARE, Shark Advocates International, and other like-minded NGOs have asked for science based catch limits on threatened thorny skates.

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Sep. 13/11

No one knows for sure but scientists think over six million tons of marine debris may be entering our ocean every year. One of the reasons Project AWARE is collecting marine debris data from divers is to help build a clear picture of the underwater trash that threatens ocean life. With this knowledge, we can make more effective decisions when it comes to waste management policies.

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